About Dan Nexon
Daniel Nexon is an associate professor in the Department of Government and the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He is the author of The Struggle for Power in Early Modern Europe: Religious Conflict, Dynastic Empires, and International Change.

Short Overview

September 4, 2019 0

While debates over Trumpism currently consume foreign-policy watchers, scholars of world politics generally focus on longer-term developments. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States faced no great-power peer competitors. It Read More

The Debate Over “Liberal International Order”

September 3, 2019 0

The last two years has seen a fierce debate about the very idea of “liberal international order.” Patrick Porter—who has a book on the subject coming out—and Paul Staniland have each written blistering criticisms. Graham Read More

Are European Powers Growing Apprehensive about China?

September 3, 2019 0

Over at Foreign Affairs, analysts Julianne Smith And Torrey Taussig see increasing European concern with China’s illiberalism and its explicit quest for technological dominance. Of particular concern, they argue, is China’s Belt and Road Initiative Read More

Managing Exit: Progressive Foreign Policy

September 3, 2019 0

Back in 2018 I wrote a piece for Foreign Affairs called “Toward a Neo-Progressive Foreign Policy: the Case for an Internationalist Left.” Some readers may notice that, on my editor’s advice, I modeled the start Read More

Weaponized Interdependence and Alternative-Order Building

September 3, 2019 0

“Weaponized Interdependence” is an exciting new concept in international affairs. Pioneered by international-relations scholars Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman, it refers to the ability of governments to manipulate “choke points” and surveillance capabilities generated by Read More

An Outline of the Book

September 3, 2019 0

In Exit from Hegemony, we explore the theory and practice of the American hegemonic system. We argue that there are three distinct principles of liberal international order: democratic political systems that broadly respect political and Read More

1989 and the Collapse of the Soviet System

September 3, 2019 0

The 1980s had its own cottage industry of books and articles predicting the decline of American power. Experts argued that Japan was on track to become the world’s largest economy. The Soviet Union and its Read More

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